Struggling readers

Create Summer Readers with "Audie 2015" Audiobook Standouts

Here's list to grow readers from the world of audiobooks, the format for learning that engages struggling and other readers when books in print do not.

The format, that is essential for students with print disabilities, helps learners access the same books that their peers are reading in print. The literacy that can result from "ear reading" creates "academic" knowledge and the "social" opportunity to "talk books" and be part of literacy conversations struggling readers so often miss.

Video Trailers Whet Learner Appetites for Audiobooks: A Strategy for Struggling Readers

I Am Malala by Malala Yousafzai and Christina Lamb is a trailer from Viewing the video is a strategy that could engage readers with an audiobook and its author and or illustrator before listening.

8 Literacy Ideas on How to Use Learning Ally Audiobooks to Deter a Summer Slide

Summer reading can be painful when decoding problems and/or a slow reading rate means a child or teen will struggle to read traditional books in print. Instead, reading accessible book formats can turn the experience into something exciting—reading for pleasure.

Alternative Formats

Audiobooks, especially those that have built-in learning supports that some learners need, help to develop literacy skills, maintain gains during the school year, and deter an academic slide.

An Argument About Matching Texts to Students

A reader wrote:

My main response is toward your general notion of the research surrounding teaching kids "at their level."

How Much Text Complexity Can Teachers Scaffold?

How much of a "gap" can be compensated through differentiation? If my readers are at a 400 Lexile level, is there an effective way to use a 820 level chapter book?

This is a great question. (Have you ever noticed that usually means the responder thinks he has an answer).

Mother-Daughter "Accessible" Book Club: Inspired by Common Sense Media with a Twist

It is Mother's Day weekend. Reading books together can build strong connections between moms and their daughters, says the popular education and advocacy group that promotes safe technology and media for children.

Library of Congress: "Accessible" Books by DiCamillo, Patterson, Scieszka: Pure Joy for Dyslexic, Other Struggling Readers

Lucky guests can set aside "author studies" today, May 6. They will learn about literacy from the masters when the authors of Stinky Cheese Man And Other Fairly Stupid Tales (Jon Scieszka), The Bridge to Terabithia (Katherine Paterson), and Flora & Ulysses: The Illuminated Adventures (Kate DiCamillo) convene at the Library of Congress (LOC) for an event that is open to the public and sure to be crowded. 

Jump On In: Special Needs Radio Is a Quick, Smart Destination for Professional Growth, Insights

So many special education webinars, so little time. It is hard to choose. But, podcasts can be a short, sweet, and entertaining opportunity to inform teaching and learning.

Jump On In

When Sharon Plante uses her combined expertise of technology in education and learning disabilities for her #spedchat "Learning Differently" podcast interviews, the BAM Radio Network's Special Education Channel comes alive with 12 minutes of engaging key conversations, information, opinions, and resources. 

5 Reasons Why Dyslexic, Other Young Readers Need Accessible Books to Grow Emotionally

Young people with dyslexia and other print disabilities need the same opportunities for social-emotional learning as their peers. Some of this growth occurs as they read books. A student with a print disability needs the same benefit from literature; but this student requires an accessible version in order to access the text. This is possible at no cost and happening for students whose educational team considers and elects accessible education materials (AEM) during an Individualized Education Program (IEP) meeting. 

Books make a big difference

Working with children means that you work with the significant adults in their lives. I’ve often found — both personally and professionally — that parents are flummoxed by the huge number of messages about raising children; all too often parenting becomes fraught with guilt.

I also know that all parents simply want the best for their children. They just may not know how to provide it. I saw this firsthand when I worked with parents who had been separated from their children due to incarceration.


"There is no substitute for books in the life of a child." — May Ellen Chase